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Bodmin comes together to remember the rebellion
The group converged at the Thomas Flamank memorial by Lower Bore Street. Former Bodmin MP and joint rebellion leader Flamank was executed in London on June 27, 1497. Photos Paul Williams

The group converged at the Thomas Flamank memorial by Lower Bore Street. Former Bodmin MP and joint rebellion leader Flamank was executed in London on June 27, 1497. Photos Paul Williams

30th June 2021

By Ollie Young

Bodmin turned out to remember one of the most important days in its history on Sunday morning. The Cornish Rebellion of 1497 was an uprising that saw an army made up of predominantly Cornishmen marched to South London in a bid to stop King Henry VII’s harsh taxation policy on the county.

Led by Bodmin’s Thomas Flamank and Michael An Gof of St Keverne, an army of around 20,000 men battled their way through the country until they were defeated at the battle of Deptford Bridge by the Royal troops.

In the aftermath, Bodmin’s Flamank and An Gof were hung, drawn and quartered before having their decapitated heads displayed on London Bridge.

Flamank had been MP for Bodmin in 1492. The Flamank family is of great antiquity in Bodmin, having held the manor of Nanstallon in uninterrupted succession from the fourteenth to the nineteenth century.

Back in the present, on Sunday, a crowd, which included the mayor Jeremy Cooper and his deputy Phil Cooper, marked the day by attending the Celtic cross and plaque dedicated to Flamank.

Mayor Cooper thanked those in attendance for coming whilst Keith Truscott and his wife led the singing of Trelawny.

Remarkably, three generations of the descendants of Thomas Flamank attended the ceremony on Sunday with the name and family still prevalent in Bodmin and across Cornwall.

Flamank and An Gof are also commemorated with a statue in St Keverne and Blackheath Common, and another, en route, at Guildford at the location of a preliminary skirmish.

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